Herd Health

The Piedmont Equine Practice now recommends deworming horses on a conservative schedule that is based on performing Fecal Egg Counts (FEC).  The change in protocol is due to the rising concern for parasite resistance to our current dewormers and based on numerous scientific research studies.

“Low Shedder” Deworming Schedule

(under 200 eggs per gram on Fecal Egg Count)

March 1

Beginning of worm control cycle

* Perform a fecal egg count on each horse.
* Treat all horses regardless of the FEC results(entering heavy parasite season).

* Use QUEST PLUS (Moxidectin with Praziquantel)

July No treatments are needed over summer months due to low worm burden at the start of the season. Parasites do not thrive in hot, dry conditions.

September 1

 

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January 1

* Perform a fecal egg count on each horse.
* Treat all horses regardless of the FEC results(entering heavy parasite season).* Use QUEST (Moxidectin)

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Use Ivermectin to kill bots  and other parasites

 

Deworming Schedule for:

“Moderate Shedders(200-500 eggs per gram on Fecal Egg Count) and

“High Shedders” (500+ eggs per gram on Fecal Egg Count)

March 1

Beginning of worm control cycle

* Perform a fecal egg count on each horse.
* Treat all horses regardless of the FEC results(entering heavy parasite season).

* Use QUEST PLUS  (Moxidectin and Praziquentel)

June 1 Strongid paste, dose by weight.
Repeat FEC 14 days after treatment to be sure the worm burden has decreased.
August same as June
September 1 * Perform a fecal egg count on each horse.
* Treat all horses regardless of the FEC results(entering heavy parasite season).* Use QUEST (Moxidectin)
November 1 No treatment needed.
January 1 Ivermectin

 

* New arrivals to the herd with an unknown deworming history should be treated with Quest.  Follow the next day with a single dose of Ivermectin.

* Horses visiting for less than 6 weeks can be treated with a single dose of Ivermectin.

* When bringing fecal balls to the clinic for the FEC, one ball per horse is sufficient.

Deworming Schedule For Foals (under 12 months old):

* Dose at least 25% higher than the foal’s estimated body weight.
* Do not deworm until at least 60 days of age.
* Do not use Quest or Ivermectin until at least 6 months of age due to resistance concerns.
* Schedule fecal exams at 6 and 12 months of age. Deworming strategy may be altered due to high fecal egg count.

2 months Anthelcide
4 months Panacur
6 months Strongid and perform fecal egg count
8 months Anthelcide
10 months Panacur
12 months Quest Plus and perform fecal egg count

Piedmont Equine Practice recommends the following vaccinations:

– Spring –

  • Intra-nasal or injectable influenza (Flu)
  • Rhinopneumonitis (Rhino)
  • West Nile Virus (WNV)
  • Eastern/Western Encephalitis and Tetanus (EWT)

– Fall –

  • Intra-nasal or injectable influenza
  • Rhinopneumonitis
  • West Nile Virus
  • Rabies should be given once annually either in the Spring or Fall

health infoHorses at risk for Strangles (Strep equi) disease should receive this Intranasal vaccine annually. These are horses that are traveling and housed with horses from different farms, horses that are kept at large boarding operations and young horses with naive immune systems. If your horse has no history of being vaccinated with Strangles they will need an initial vaccine followed by a booster given 3-4 weeks later.

Potomac Horse Fever is endemic in this region, occurring most frequently in the summer. Horses should be vaccinated in the spring.

Botulism is an optional vaccine and is recommended for horses that are fed round bales. It is also often administered to broodmares to provide passive immunity to their foals. This vaccine is usually given in the fall in anticipation of round bale feeding during winter months. If your horse has no history of being vaccinated for Botulism they will need 3 vaccines given one month apart to start, and then the vaccine is given once annually thereafter.

Horses heading south for the winter show season should be boostered for EWT and WNV prior to departure.

Horses with no vaccination history, in particular those horses that were recently imported from foreign countries, need at least the basic vaccine set (Rabies, EWT, Flu/Rhino, WNV) followed by a second round (boosters) given 3-4 weeks later.

Piedmont Equine does not currently endorse any vaccines used to protect horses from EPM or Lyme Disease.

– Broodmares –

All broodmares should receive all spring vaccines 4-6 weeks prior to parturition. This may include the rotavirus or botulism vaccines if the mare is foaling on an “at risk” farm. Broodmares should also receive the Rhinopneumonitis (Pneumabort K) vaccine at 3, 5, 7, and 9 months of gestation.

– Weanlings –

All vaccines given at 6 months, then boostered again 3-4 weeks following the first series. A third dose of vaccines may be repeated at one year of age. Vaccines should be based on potential level of exposure.

Contact Us

4122 Zulla Road
The Plains, VA 20198

Phone: 540-364-4950
Fax: 540-364-4987


Phone: 540-364-4954

Office Hours of Operation
Monday8:00am – 5:00pm
Tuesday8:00am – 5:00pm
Wednesday8:00am – 5:00pm
Thursday8:00am – 5:00pm
Friday8:00am – 5:00pm
SaturdayClosed
SundayClosed

We are on call 24/7 for emergencies.